GARDEN FAVOURITE; AQUILEGIA

You know, when you are young you stare at middle aged people in disbelief.

“What are you doing… spending so much time in the garden?”, is the thought running through you head as older people prance around their gardens fussing their plants as if they were newly born children.

It’s funny because suddenly you become that person.

As you grow order, the garden becomes something very different. It’s no longer a place to kick a ball about in, or something that you have to occasionally hack away at to keep it from overgrowing.

It becomes a place of wonder.

And I have to say that is what’s happened to us.

For the first time really, we are taking a real interest in what’s growing there, and what could grow there if we knew a bit more.

So, we thought we’d do a few blogs on the flowers and other aspects of our garden and what we like about them.

First up is the aquilegia. There are about forty different types of aquilegia, or granny bonnet’s as they are sometimes known.

In our garden they self-seed all over the place, cropping up in nooks and crannies where other plants would never thrive.

Aquilegia’s long stems and bright, delicate flowers give them a vulnerability that other, more robust flowers don’t have. Their bright colours demand your attention, but they aren’t brash or startling in anyway, like garden flowers associated with the height of summer.

It’s as if these late spring flowers are a sign or signal that summer is almost upon us, but it’s not quite there yet … they therefore seem delicate and cautious as they display their marvellously delicate plume.

What we like so much about them is that you can never be sure of their colour or type. The one pictured which is growing next to our pond is purple and white.

We’ve looked them up. We think it’s the ‘William Guinness’, but we are really not sure.

There’s another aquilegia growing next to it, due to flower any day now. What colour or variety this one will be is anyone’s guess.

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